Centre for the Acropolis Studies

The Centre for the Acropolis Studies, housed in the Weiler Building, was inaugurated in 1987 by the late Minister for Culture, Melina Merkouri. It is a part of the new Acropolis Museum and its research workshops.

The museum displays a series of casts depicting successive uses of the rock of the Acropolis from prehistoric Neolithic times to the 18th century. There are also a series of original terracotta architectural remains from the building that stood on the sacred rock in the Archaic and Classical period, and parts of the sculpted acroteria and lion – headed terracotta water- spouts of these building.

Two large rooms on the ground floor house plaster – casts of the composition on the eastern and western pediments of the Parthenon, the plaster casts of the temple’ s metopes and frieze as well as one of the two marble acroteria of the temple.

On the first floor visitors will find 1) a permanent exhibition on the works of conservation and restoration , 2) exhibits concerning the Erechtheion and other Acropolis monuments and 3) an exhibition of clay-tiled roofs of the Acropolis monuments.

the Weiler Building

Located on the pedestrian street across from the New Acropolis Museum on Makrygianni Street, the Weiler Building was designed and built in 1836 by Bavarian military engineer Wilhelm von Weiler, and housed the Army Hospital.

Centre for the Acropolis Studies

In 1920, the police regiment began using the facility as its barracks, and in December 1944, the building became a centrepiece of civil struggles. Originally designed in the German neo-romantic style, its stone masonry originally had a visible coating. Following the battles of 1944, the coating was destroyed, exposing the stonework. Since 1978 it has belonged to the Ministry of Culture. Restructured between 1985 and 1987, the building today houses the Museum of the Centre for Acropolis Studies.


Centre for the Acropolis Studies

2-4, Makriyianni street,
117 42 Athens, Greece
Telephone: +30 210 9239381

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